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Scuba diving is a great, relaxing and amazing water sport that, as many others, can expose you to some dangerous underwater accidents. First of all, you need to consider that you can be injured if your body is not in the proper conditions and able to adjust to the increasing and decreasing pressure of the water as you breathe compressed air. Pressure changes also can cause damage when you descend into the water and come back up. This practice’s injuries may be mild, however, some of them can cause severe problems and in the worst case, death. But, don’t worry, today, we brought information about three different injuries related to pressure changes. Be ready and let’s plan your next diving excursion!

  1. Decompression sickness

Decompression sickness happens when a scuba diver ascends too quickly. As you know, divers breathe compressed air that contains nitrogen. At higher pressure underwater, the nitrogen gas goes into the body’s tissues. In case, the diver is down the water, this phenomenon does not cause a problem, and if a diver goes to the surface at the right rate, the nitrogen can slowly and safely leave the body through the lungs. However, if a diver rises too quickly, the nitrogen can probably form bubbles in the body, damaging tissues and nerves. In extreme cases, it can cause paralysis or death if the bubbles are in the brain.

[Carlos Aguilera]: Be safe and avoid diving problems

[Carlos Aguilera]: Be safe and avoid diving problems

  1. Barotrauma

Tissues near the air-filled spaces of your body, such as your ears, sinuses, dental roots, and lungs can be damaged if your body cannot equalize the pressure between it and the surrounding water. As you descend, water pressure increases, and the volume of air in your body decreases. All this can cause problems such as sinus pain or a ruptured eardrum. When you ascend, water pressure decreases, and the air in your lungs expands. This can make the air sacs in your lungs rupture and make it hard for you to breathe. If the artery receives some of these bubbles, they can result blocked affecting your organs. Depending on where the bubbles are, you could have a heart attack or a stroke.

  1. Nitrogen narcosis

[Carlos Aguilera]: Practice breathing techniques

[Carlos Aguilera]: Practice breathing techniques

Sometimes deep dives can cause so much nitrogen to build up in the brain that you can become confused and act as  you have been drinking alcohol. In those cases, taking decisions is difficult. Narcosis usually happens only on dives of more than 100 feet.

By [Carlos Aguilera].

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